Fall is brilliant, but occasionally not so much


I love fall, and I know I’m not alone.

There’s just something about the crisp air, the tang of apples and wood smoke, the sight of turning leaves, the shorter days and chilly nights.

Though I no longer have school-aged children, I love that “most wonderful time of the year” the Staples commercial touts when buses roll again, and kids are walking by our home on their way to and fro. I love seeing toddlers taking hayrides to pick apples, and our neighbors ringing ‘round their firepit.

And apple cider! Need I say more?

Yet, like all good things, fall can have a dark side.

With the advent of colder temperatures and earlier darkness, it can be hard to get in that outdoor exercise that’s so essential for all of us.

As the days get shorter, with less sunlight, those suffering from Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) may struggle with depression and anxiety.

Anticipation of late fall and early winter holidays may stress those with complicated family situations.

Those in various schools of education may be overwhelmed with new information, tasks, or requirements.

Here are some suggestions to help you stay healthy and minimize stress in your life in this lovely season:

  • There are some astoundingly healthy fall vegetables and fruits. Consider pumpkin, which is darn near perfect, full of vitamins A and C, fiber and lots of other good nutrition. They not only make a great Jack-0-Lantern, they make a great snack, too. Think beyond pie and those yummy pumpkin spice lattes and you’ll be surprised how delicious they can be.

  • It’s time to plan ahead for winter ‘flu season and get a ‘flu shot. Do it.

  • Before it gets too cold or dark, spend as much time as you can outside. The crisp air is a gift between the sweltering air of summer and the freezing temperatures of winter.

  • Fall is a great time to explore local farmer’s markets and enjoy the bounty of the harvest – broccoli, squashes, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, kale, and eggplant are especially abundant and rich in versatility as well as abundance and nutrition.

  • When tailgating, try to eat lean like an athlete rather than overeat like a spectator. It’s easy to pack on the pounds with unhealthy options, but try to stick to whole, healthy foods.

  • Moderate your passion for Halloween candy. Just because every store puts it out about back-to-school time, doesn’t mean you should eat it.

  • On a big eating holiday such as Thanksgiving, make sure you begin the day with a protein-and-fiber packed breakfast. It’s tempting to skip that meal, knowing you’ll be eating more later, but eating a good breakfast makes it more likely you’ll make good, informed food choices later because you won’t be famished.

These suggestions are by no means exhaustive, but hopefully one or more of them will help you enjoy the upcoming fall season just that little bit more.

If you struggle with transitions, with relationships, or just with life, give us a call. We specialize in helping you live your best life, and want to walk along side you in whatever you’re struggling with.

Sanctuary Christian Counseling LLC

9974 Molly Pitcher Highway, Suite 4

Shippensburg, PA 17257

717-200-3158

ellen@sanctuarychristiancounseling.com

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